About

DSC_0602Lightfoot Restaurant is the creation of co-owners Executive Chef Ingrid Gustavson and General Manager Carrie Gustavson. Both the restaurant and the town were named in honor of Loudoun County hero and American statesman Francis Lightfoot Lee, who made his mark as one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence.

Although Leesburg was originally named George Town for George II, the name was changed in 1757 by a bill introduced in the House of Burgesses by Francis Lightfoot Lee. The bill established the Town of Leesburgh in honor of his father, Thomas Lee of Stratford. Both were descendants of the Lee’s of Virginia, a significant family in the history of Loudoun County that also helped shape the history of the United States.

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Classic American Cuisine

In keeping with that rich heritage, Lightfoot offers local color steeped in history. We specialize in imaginative cuisine that tastes as exquisite as it looks, with a captivating setting and elegant ambience.

Appetizers are prepared and presented with mouthwatering perfection. Entreés and buffets are works of art. Desserts and breads are made fresh daily on-site. The wine list is both extensive and inspired.

Treasures Abound

DSC_0564From the special touches that can be found in every private party room, to the unique wine bank vault in the restaurant bar, Lightfoot is designed to delight the senses.

Gilded lions add architectural interest on the building’s exterior and were the inspiration for the restaurant’s logo. Hand-painted Venetian chandeliers are accented with silk and bathe the rich woodwork in soft light.

The main dining room’s ceiling is cove-coffered in mahogany, carved plaster and wood moldings. Rare posters accent the walls, while the Peoples National Bank medallion flanks the molding, subtly remind guests of the restaurant’s cherished past.

Unique History

An historic landmark, Lightfoot was originally constructed in 1888 and served as Peoples National Bank for more than half a century. In 1999, the building was restored to its Romanesque Revival Style grandeur. The 349-seat restaurant also received several enhancements and additions that have made it an American classic.